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Search Results 0 to 16 of about 17 (some duplicates have been removed)
to deal with him every week? and he has failed in foreign policy. what's the point of this whole thing? what's the point of this exercise? 'cause we know his real feelings. >> well, i certainly don't. look it, the president or foreign policy or our position with regard to the world and the way the world views us in the same way you do, sean, that's not going to be a big surprise, first of all, the palestinian-- >> suck up to the muslim world work? and he's-- >> i don't feel he did, i don't feel he did. >> sean: oh, stop, please. >> and i feel those were highlights that were distracting and we' are trivializing these issues. every president had problems besides bill clinton because israel does not want to establish a two-state solution and that's the-- >> and he said he was going to fix this and he wasn't able to. saying america was arrogant in cairo didn't work, did it, colonel west? >> well, sean, let's start with andrea mitchell over at msnbc, said this is the worst relationship she's seen and she's been covering since ronald reagan. and the first interview was al-arabi al-arabiya. a
spotlight on magazine series. he writes about the role of congress in u.s. foreign policy. we will also take your calls, e- mails, and host: good morning, and welcome to the washington journal. the federal reserve chairman holds his news conference with .eporters u.s. aid officials testify on syria. the commerce panel hears from ,he faa about sequestration and a hearing on domestic use of drones. all those events and more on c- span.org. 10 years ago today marks the us- led invasion into iraq. that is where we begin this morning to get your take on the 10th anniversary. here are the numbers -- host: send us a tweet or post your comments on facebook. we will get to your phone calls in just a minute. is the us from baghdad pentagon correspondent for the washington post. begin with your headline this morning. at least 60 are killed in iraq on tuesday. what happened, and is this a pattern? guest: it has been the deadliest day since u.s. troops have pulled out. an al qaeda group took responsibility for this wave of bombings, and said it was doing so to seek revenge from the government. hearing si
their own energy. lou: we have not address the energy -- issue central to our foreign policy go about -- over last two decades, and it's about damn time our leaders started thinking about them. thank you both. we appreciate very much. thank you. much more on the president's day in israel and the tensions that are rising in the middle east. we will have much more throughout this broadcast. the president's gun-control agenda is on life support. we'll take a look at the real reason for its demise in tonight's "chalk talk". staying the course. fed chair ben bernanke says easing money is here to stay. ubs chief economist with us on the economy, the market, and the fed next. ♪ ♪ lou: ben bernanke's federal reserve keeping money cheap, plentiful. chief economist for ubs will tell us whether this is sufficient magic for the market through the remainder of the year. let's take a look at what happened on wall street. today's talks are moving higher. investors expecting just the news that they received, the fed's standing fast, holding steady, helping -- keeping 85 billion a month into the m
solutions for middle east peace. it will take a lot more in a few days to fix the reckless foreign policy of the last now fewer years. he is aware of the challenge. >> i'm meeting none of these challenges will not be easy. ultimately it's not a hard problem. its hard slog to work through all these issues. it's hard. >> sean: aside from hitting the links in tiger woods and paling around with beyonce, it's hard work being the leader of the world. his trip didn't go entirely as planned. it included the burning of american flag and images of obama himself. then there was some car trump when the armored cadillac limo that was supposed to transport the president, that broke down. they put in the wrong fuel and it had to be towed. what would be a speech but without a few hecklers. >> i believe your future is bound to ours. >> sean: with reminders of the week for his failures to address the problems. is he going to continue? or is he going to chart a new course. now, we bring our distinguished studio audience. thanks for being here. you can give yourself a hand, you know. am i wrong, show of hand
's good to get away from congress. >> we'll get insight on what comes next from our foreign policy experts, including abc news global affairs correspondent christiane amanpour and jeffrey goldberg. >>> hello again. you're going to see president obama touching down at andrews air force late last night after his first trip to israel as president. we'll analyze the mission and what comes next for that volatile region later in the program. >>> but, first, the debates that president obama is returning to here at home. and for that, a "this week" first, jim messina and karl rove join our powerhouse roundtable. welcome to both of you, along with donna brazile, peggy noonan and "nightline" anchor terry moran. karl, let me begin with you, 5:00 a.m., the senate passes a budget. the house has already passed a budget. very stark differences between the two, everyone waiting for president obama to weigh in on this. i guess my question to you is, despite those stark differences, do you see this as the beginning of negotiations toward a compromise? >> i frankly take this as a constructive sign. it gives
. >> shepard: let's bring in michael ohandlan. specialeess in defense and foreign policy. >> hi. >> shepard: where are we now in this conflict? >> i think you and jonathan have been summarizing it well. you can say the insurgents have some momentum but everytime you feel like you make that case they suffer a setback or we're remind of their fractious nature, and the regime is still get can weapons from iran and i'm not seeing we're seeing a shift in. i it's a stalemate with successes on either side. the insurgents are doing a little better but not persuasive they'll take the country or drive assad from power. i hope sew but have not seen enough evidence. this could be a settling into a long situation in which the government holds some neighborhoods, the insurgents hold others and it keeps going for a very long time. >> with the president's trip to israel, the jordan, toothier talking to turkey, and then secretary kerry's trip to iraq, get the idea there's some consensus about what to do next. >> that's a fair point. i think you have been tracking this very well, and you also are aware of th
it all up, it's probably $2 trillion to $3 trillion of american costs, distorted american foreign policy. the idea that we took so much of our situation after the end of the cold war and we devoted it to iraq given everything else we could've, should've done. historians will scratch their head and say why did the united states get so distracted and distorted -- >> and stayed there after we knew there weren't weapons. >> and that's the big lesson we should draw from this in afghanistan. we've got to respect local realities. united states cannot go around the middle east and remake it in our liking. we've got to have a degree of humility about the limits of our influence. and you asked whether we learned the lessons. with vietnam, iraq and afghanistan, i hope we've learnlearn ed. >> and iraq and afghanistan. first of all, be far, far more skeptical than most of us were going in to iraq. also, no matter how far you are down the path, if it's the wrong path, turn around. and we should've done that. i want to read what you talked about the human cost. mike barnicle e-mailed me this last night
. it was a name juror foreign policy objective of the obama administration when he came in. special envoy grossman who took mr. holbrooke's place when he passed away had a principle mission to do that but those negotiations broke down because one, the karzai government was not involved, pakistan was not involved and the various influential groups inside afghanistan were also not involved. the fact that karzai is beginning the initiative i don't see anything wrong with that. i think it's the beginning of a very long process which is also troubled by the opposition that the factions have and the strong views. i mean people in afghanistan do not want the taliban to take control of any of the population inside of afghanistan after a negotiated settlement to be sure. jenna: you mentioned the factions though. it was interesting doing a little research for this segment i realize the state department does not list the taliban as a terrorist organization. there are different taliban-related groups, for example, a taliban, i want to call it a sector, a taliban group in pakistan that is listed as a terrorist
dominated politics on three issues -- foreign policy, taxes, and social issues. among social issues, they won the battle and lost the war. there is no single social issue in your favor going forward. on taxes, you stand for giving breaks to the rich. they didreign policy, not support the bush foreign policy, so the stoll that made that republican party dominant come all three issues are in democratic favre. until you deal with these problems, it does not matter until network -- it does not matter what network you have. conservatives and, smaller government, less intrusion, and with they will have to figure out how to mollify the social movement. >> i do not think anyone has suggested the only thing that republicans are waiting right now is doing any better data bases and do we need more storefront offices. i was responding to a question directly about that. there is a lot of discussion going on right now about positioning, policies, looking for some of integrating new program pauses, how do we explain our policies better. i do not accept the premise that there is no doubt when you l
foundation and asian studies center. when we started it 1983, it was our first dedicated foreign policy center at the heritage foundation. back and asian security was all about what was happening here in the cold war. from that perspective, the study of the soviet union might have made more sense. to as we talked, we talked about the potential it could be conceivable u.s. trade with asia with equal trade across the atlantic. today it is much several times greater than that we have them blessed that over the years we have seen their remarkable economic growth and development. it is our pleasure to recognize that in terms of economic freedom as it has evolved throughout asia and pacific countries and indeed throughout the region. wheel is new our good and friends in japan and that a mutual relationship, the mutual defense treaty would be central. but we also thought asia deserved fully of broader treatment in its own right so we invested in the future. as we look ahead but those in the range of foreign and strategic and economic policy issues coming today it is hard to distinguish one fro
. >> or foreign policy. >> spoiler alert, we got bin laden. >> i have an announcement to make. >> reporter: it's become a desperate quest to avoid the dreaded spoiler. things have got on it a point where you can't say much of anything for fear of spoiling something for the people around you. but does the fault lie with the spoiler or the spoilee? >> if you care enough about a show that it would bother you to be spoiled, then watch the show when it airs, and if you can't watch the show, then it's incumbent upon you to stay off twitter, stay off the internet and don't talk to your friends who watch the show. >> reporter: another spoiler rule? respect the statute of limitations. >> you can't say omar got killed on "the wire" because someone will say oh, i just started the dvds and i'm on season three and i can't believe did you that to me. that show was on in like 2002. >> reporter: at some point, big and small screen civil society expects to you know that rosebud is a sled, the kid sees dead people and kristen shot j.r. and spoiler alert, matthew, hurry up. >> i can't watch it again. no. >> the
that the chairlady just asked to be put in order are incredibly fundamental, important foreign policy issues that you do not do at 3:00 in the morning and change the dynamics of the middle east, change the dynamics of our national security and interests in international organizations. that's what some of these amendments will to. and you don't do it in a budget process. do you it through regular order in a committee that ultimately can hear both sides, as we have succeeded so far in this session in a very bipartisan way. so i will not object because of the gentlelady's effort to get us to a conclusion. but i will be urging all of our colleagues to oppose all of those amendments because this is foreign policy on the fly, and it is dangerous. and we send very important messages when we cast votes in certain ways that can affect the balance of stability in the middle east, that can affect our relationships across the world, that can affect our effectiveness in institutions that we need at the end of the day to promote our national security and our national interests. mrs. murray: madam president? the pr
about it, foreign aid -- we never talk about it, foreign aid, our foreign policy hasn't been reauthorized for years. there hasn't been a full-time inspector general in the state department in six years. we have seven open spots for inspector generals to actually look at this stuff and to advise us and advise the agencies. so we're failing to do our job. and my only wish of my colleagues is to get informed, and if you're on a committee, you don't have to solve it the way i'd solve it, but just solve it. it makes no sense to continue to duplicate things. as a matter of fact, in job training, here's what g.a.o. said. of the 47 job training programs for nondisabled people -- we have another 53 for the disabled. of the 47, all but three do exactly the same thing. all right? so either g.a.o. is lying or they're not. if they're not lying, why wouldn't we in the next two months in this place fix those programs, to make them where they're actually giving real skills that will give a real livelihood to people who need real job training? no effort at all to do that. the house just passe
Search Results 0 to 16 of about 17 (some duplicates have been removed)